In 2002, the Storting adopted a Zero Vision. This is a vision of no one killed or seriously injured in road traffic.

The National Transport Plan for 2022–2033 sets a milestone for the development in the number of killed and seriously injured. The ambition is that there will be a maximum of 350 killed and seriously injured in 2030.

Ever since 1970, long-term and targeted traffic safety work has been conducted in Norway, and this has yielded results. The number of deaths per year has decreased from 560 in 1970 to about 100 in recent years.

The positive development is also due to close and good cooperation between important actors such as the Ministry of Transport, the Norwegian Public Roads Administration, the police, the Norwegian Directorate of Health, the Norwegian Directorate of Education, municipal and county authorities, Trygg Trafikk and a number of other organizations.

The zero vision is a clarification that it is morally and ethically unacceptable for people to be killed or seriously injured in traffic accidents. In addition, accidents constitute a cost to the traffic system that we can not accept, despite the benefits of road traffic.

The zero vision is thus both an ethical guide and a guideline for further traffic safety work in Norway. This means, among other things, that the transport system, means of transport and regulations for behaviour must be designed in a way that promotes safe behaviour among road users, and contributes as much as possible to human error not leading to serious injuries or death.